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     The Book of Caradoc Britain is the one we know but with patchy technology and no central government, made up mostly of small communes and a few larger Authorities, many of them feuding, while still threatened by marauding gangs called Metros out of the wreckage of old cities.
Into this world Caradoc, a young and bereaved commune-dweller, is driven by curiosity to explore. By chance and talent he becomes Britain’s Dux Bellorum, or war leader, but finally disappears overseas. Like King Arthur, he may one day return.
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About the time I was preparing abridged translations for my WexYork Compact Classics series, TV and movie screens were suffused with a hectic flush of epics set in a never-never age featuring barbarians wielding swords like brass bedsteads while Roman legionaries peered along theirs over the tops of shields like dwarfs playing snooker. I decided then that I wanted to write a modern but believable prose epic set in a Britain part-dismantled by some catastrophe referred to simply as “the withering.” This is it.
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